G2A Acknowledges Sale of Stolen Activation Keys

G2A is a favorite service among many gamers since it offers the opportunity to purchase games at prices that are considerably lower in comparison to the competition.

Throughout the years, the service has faced a backlash from publishers and customers who had reported that stolen keys have been sold via the platform. The nature of the service allows any interested third-party to register seller accounts and offer keys without the need to justify their origin, an issue that has been highlighted several times.

Accepting the truth

After several years of denying such claims, the company has finally acknowledged that it did sell stolen keys, but only a single case has been addressed

In an attempt to address the growing controversies, G2A attempted to mend its relationship with affected developers by launching a promotion. If it could be proved that the platform has intermediated the selling of stolen keys, G2A would pay ten times the cost of the keys.

Most developers refused the offer, but the team behind Factorio accepted the offer. After more than one year, G2A has admitted that it did sell stolen Factorio keys.

Nothing has changed

G2A announced via a post on the public blog of the company that an internal investigation has revealed that 198 Factorio keys that were sold on the platform were, in fact, stolen. The terms of the agreement will be respected, and Wube Software, who developed Factorio, will receive $39,600 from the company.

The blog stament mentioned that G2A strives to combat fraud as it affects all the parties who are involved in the transaction. Developers will also receive the full value of chargeback fees, which are caused by keys sold on G2A as long as they can prove that the source was illegal.

However, the company has no plans to implement methods which would prevent the sale of stolen keys in the first place

Willie Hahn, senior editor at The Trending Times, writes about the intersection between money and politics with a focus on lobbying and tech articles. Willie previously at the Android Authority and Vice. Willie can be reached by email.

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